Saturday, February 23, 2019

The men privileged positioning


Leer más...

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

#MyVoiceMatters - Community Voices to End FGM




http://www.endfgm.eu/editor/files/2019/02/_MyVoiceMatters_Toolkit_06022019.pptx.pdf
Leer más...

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Celebrating 25 years of the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women: Call for submissions


With 2019 marking the 25th anniversary of the creation of the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, as well as the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), it is also a precursor to the review, in 2020, of a number of key landmark women’s rights instruments, including: 25 years since the adoption of the Beijing Platform for Action (1995); 20 years since the adoption of Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) on women, peace and security; and 5 years since the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (2015).   
Recent years have witnessed a shift in the global landscape representing women’s rights, with the emerging #MeToo and #NiUnaMenos movements and their various manifestations across regions of the world highlighting sexual violence and harassment against women, and the gender inequality triggered by that violence and harassment. The newfound global momentum to end violence against women now faces an upsurge in retrogressive movements and measures.   
Sexual violence and harassment and other challenges to the human rights of women must be addressed through the robust application of international human rights law. International standards need to be embodied in national law, and institutions and procedures must be available to enforce the law.  The challenge remains as to how we can ensure that these standards, along with relevant international and regional human rights standards and mechanisms are fully implemented.
It is within this context that the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, Ms. Dubravka Simonovic, considers that this is a key moment in time to reflect on the challenges now facing women in attaining their rights, and to analyse the adequacy of the international legal framework on violence against women with a view to ascertaining how her mandate can address these challenges going forward. 
Taking into consideration the important role that different stakeholders play in reinforcing universal human rights standards, she therefore wishes to secure views from States, National Human Rights Institutions, Non-governmental organizations, as well as members of academia on the following questions:
As we look to the future, please indicate what are the main challenges to addressing violence against women in its various forms; e.g. the institutional and substantive disconnect between the different international instruments; a lack of understanding of the provisions in international law that link gender equality and violence against women; inadequate judicial protocol or recourse and/or legal framework; impunity of perpetrators; stereotypes and the social stigma associated with reporting etc.?
As the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women enters its 25th year, please provide a brief analysis of what your perceptions of the mandate are, highlighting any particular instances where you believe the Special Rapporteur has contributed to the empowerment of women in addressing gender based violence.
Given the changed landscape of women’s rights and the current global challenges in this regard, please indicate what specific measures should be taken to further strengthen the role of the mandate of the Special Rapporteur to accelerate prevention and elimination of violence against women
Please indicate what steps should be taken to ensure that the mandate of the Special Rapporteur can  effectively contribute to ensuring better institutional coordination across the various international and regional violence against women and gender equality mechanisms for the elimination of violence against women
Please specify what measures should be taken to support the initiative of the Special Rapporteur to encourage States to establish femicide watch and/ or observatories
Please indicate what are the opportunities and challenges for strengthening and using the mandate of the Special Rapporteur under the international and regional frameworks to eradicate violence against women and girls, and to accelerate that elimination

Please feel free to respond to one or more questions. All submissions should be sent to vaw@ohchr.org by 28 February and will be used to inform the forthcoming report of the Special Rapporteur to the Human Rights Council in June 2019. You are kindly requested to provide your submissions in English, French or Spanish, which are the working languages of the Secretariat.
Leer más...

Friday, February 1, 2019

Intensification of efforts to prevent and eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls: sexual harassment 3/3



10. Encourages States, in efforts to prevent and eliminate sexual harassment, to work in partnership with the private sector and civil society, including women’s and community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, feminist groups, women human rights defenders, girls’ and youth-led organizations and trade, labour and other professional unions, as well as other relevant stakeholders;  

11. Urges States to ensure the promotion and protection of the human rights of all women and their sexual and reproductive health, and reproductive rights in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development,12 the Beijing Platform for Action11 and the outcome documents of their review conferences, including through the development and enforcement of policies and legal frameworks and the strengthening of health systems that make universally accessible and available quality, comprehensive sexual and reproductive health-care services, commodities, information and education, including safe and effective methods of modern contraception, emergency contraception, prevention programmes for adolescent pregnancy, maternal health care such as skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care, which will reduce obstetric fistula and other complications of pregnancy and delivery, safe abortion where such services are permitted by national law, and prevention and treatment of reproductive tract infections, sexually transmitted infections, HIV and reproductive cancers, recognizing that human rights include the right to have control over and decide freely and responsibly on matters related to their sexuality, including sexual and reproductive health, free from coercion, discrimination and violence;  

12. Calls upon States to take necessary measures to ensure that employers in all sectors are held accountable when they fail to abide by laws and regulations addressing sexual harassment, where they exist;  

13. Also calls upon States to prevent, address and prohibit violence, including sexual harassment, against women and girls in public and political life, including women in leadership positions, journalists and other media workers and human rights defenders, including through practical steps to prevent threats, harassment and violence, and to combat impunity by ensuring that those responsible for violations and abuses, including sexual and gender-based violence and threats, including in digital contexts, are promptly brought to justice and held accountable through impartial investigations;  

14. Further calls upon States to encourage digital technology companies, including Internet service providers and digital platforms, to strengthen or adopt positive measures with a view to eliminating violence and sexual harassment, including sexual harassment in digital contexts;  

15. Encourages States to systematically collect, analyse and disseminate data disaggregated by sex, age and other relevant parameters, including, where appropriate, administrative data from the police, the health sector, the judiciary and other relevant sectors, to consider developing methodologies to collect data on all forms of violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment, in, inter alia, digital contexts, in order to monitor all forms of such violence, such as data on the relationship between the perpetrator and the victim and geographical location, with the involvement of national statistical offices and, where appropriate, in partnership with other actors, including law enforcement agencies, in order to effectively review and implement laws, policies, strategies and preventive and protective measures, while ensuring and maintaining the privacy and the confidentiality of the victims; 

 16. Urges the international community to fulfil its commitment to supporting developing countries, particularly African countries, the least developed countries, small island developing States and landlocked developing countries, in strengthening the capacity of national statistical offices and data systems to ensure access to highquality, timely, reliable and disaggregated data, while ensuring national ownership in supporting and tracking progress on, inter alia, efforts to address violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment;  

17. Also urges the international community, including the United Nations system and, as appropriate, regional and subregional organizations, to support national efforts to promote the empowerment of women and girls and gender equality in order to enhance international efforts to eliminate violence against women and girls, through, inter alia, official development assistance and other appropriate assistance, such as facilitating the sharing of guidelines, methodologies and best practices, taking into account national priorities;  

18. Calls upon States to promote the full and effective participation of women and, as appropriate, girls in the development, implementation and monitoring of policies, programmes and other initiatives aimed at preventing and responding to violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment;  

19. Stresses the need to take necessary measures to ensure that no individual working within the United Nations system, including its agencies, funds, programmes and entities, should be involved in sexual harassment, too often perpetrated against those affected by humanitarian crises, and recognizes the efforts of the United Nations system in this regard;  

20. Encourages humanitarian assistance agencies and non-governmental organizations to adopt and implement policies to prevent, address and prohibit sexual harassment within their organizations;  

21. Stresses that, within the United Nations system, adequate resources should be assigned to the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women) and other bodies, specialized agencies, funds and programmes responsible for the promotion of gender equality, the empowerment of women and the human rights of women and girls and to efforts throughout the United Nations system to prevent and eliminate violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment, and calls upon the United Nations system to make the necessary support and resources available;  

22. Also stresses the importance of the Secretary-General’s Global Database on Violence against Women, expresses its appreciation to all those States that have provided the Database with information regarding, inter alia, their national policies and legal frameworks aimed at eliminating violence against women and girls and supporting victims of such violence, strongly encourages all States to regularly provide updated information for the Database, and calls upon all relevant entities of the United Nations system to continue to support States, at their request, in the compilation and regular updating of pertinent information and to raise awareness of the Database among all relevant stakeholders, including civil society;  

23. Calls upon all United Nations bodies, entities, funds and programmes and the specialized agencies and invites the Bretton Woods institutions to intensify their efforts at all levels to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls and to better coordinate their work, with a view to increasing effective support for national efforts to prevent and eliminate sexual harassment; 

 24. Requests the Special Rapporteur of the Human Rights Council on violence against women, its causes and consequences to present an annual report to the General Assembly at its seventy-fourth and seventy-fifth sessions;  

25. Requests the Secretary-General to submit to the General Assembly at its seventy-fifth session a report containing:  (a) Information provided by the United Nations bodies, funds and programmes and the specialized agencies on their follow-up activities to implement resolution 71/170 and the present resolution, including on their assistance to States in their efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls;  (b) Information provided by States on their follow-up activities to implement the present resolution;  

26. Also requests the Secretary-General to present an oral report to the Commission on the Status of Women at its sixty-third and sixty-fourth sessions, including information provided by the United Nations bodies, funds and programmes and the specialized agencies on recent follow-up activities to implement resolutions 69/147 and 71/170 and the present resolution, and urges United Nations bodies, entities, funds and programmes and the specialized agencies to contribute promptly to that report;  

27. Decides to continue its consideration of the elimination of all forms of violence against women and girls at its seventy-fifth session under the item entitled “Advancement of women”. 

55th plenary meeting  17 December 2018 

Leer más...

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Intensification of efforts to prevent and eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls: sexual harassment 2/3



1. Strongly condemns all forms of violence against all women and girls, including sexual harassment, recognizing that it is an impediment to the achievement of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls and to the full realization of their human rights;  

2. Acknowledges that sexual harassment is a form of violence and a violation and abuse of human rights that is likely to result in physical, psychological, sexual, economic or social harm or suffering;  

3. Stresses that sexual harassment encompasses a continuum of unacceptable and unwelcome behaviours and practices of a sexual nature that may include, but are not limited to, sexual suggestions or demands, requests for sexual favours and sexual, verbal or physical conduct or gestures, that are or might reasonably be perceived as offensive or humiliating;  

4. Urges States to condemn violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment, and reaffirms that they should not invoke any custom, tradition or religious consideration to avoid their obligations with respect to its elimination and should pursue, by all appropriate means and without delay, a policy of eliminating violence against women, as set out in the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women;9 

 5. Calls upon States to address discrimination based on multiple and intersecting factors, which places women and girls at greater risk of exploitation, violence and abuse, and to take appropriate action to empower and protect them as well as achieve their full enjoyment of human rights without discrimination;  
6. Notes that efforts by civil society organizations in eliminating violence against women and girls are complementary to those of Governments, and in this regard urges States to support, where possible, non-State-led initiatives aimed at promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls and at preventing, responding to and protecting women and girls from sexual harassment;  

7. Encourages national legislative authorities and political parties, as appropriate, to adopt codes of conduct and reporting mechanisms, or revise existing ones, stating zero tolerance by these legislative authorities and political parties for sexual harassment, intimidation and any other form of violence against women in politics;  

8. Urges States to take effective action to prevent and eliminate sexual harassment against women and girls and to address structural and underlying causes and risk factors, including by:  
(a) Designing and implementing appropriate domestic policies that are aimed at transforming discriminatory social attitudes and social and cultural patterns of conduct that condone violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment, with a view to preventing and eliminating, in all public and private spheres, discrimination, gender stereotypes, negative social norms, attitudes and behaviours, and unequal power relations by which women and girls are regarded as subordinate to men and boys and that underlie and perpetuate male domination;  
(b) Implementing, in partnership with all relevant stakeholders, effective violence prevention and response activities in schools and communities, educating children from a young age regarding the importance of treating all people with dignity and respect, and designing educational programmes and teaching materials that support gender equality, respectful relationships and non-violent behaviour;  
(c) Engaging men and boys in challenging gender stereotypes and negative social norms, attitudes and behaviours that underlie and perpetuate such violence and in developing and implementing measures that reinforce non-violent actions, attitudes and values, and encouraging men and boys, as agents and beneficiaries of change in the achievement of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls, to take an active part and become their strategic partners and allies in efforts to prevent and eliminate all forms of violence and discrimination against women and girls; 
(d) Developing policies and programmes with the support, where appropriate, of international organizations, civil society and non-governmental organizations, giving priority to formal, informal and non-formal education programmes, including scientifically accurate and age-appropriate comprehensive education that is relevant to cultural contexts, that provides adolescent girls and boys and young women and men in and out of school, consistent with their evolving capacities, and with appropriate direction and guidance from parents and legal guardians, with the best interests of the child as their basic concern, information on sexual and reproductive health and HIV prevention, gender equality and women’s empowerment, human rights, physical, psychological and pubertal development and power in relationships between women and men, to enable them to build self-esteem and foster informed decision-making, communication and risk-reduction skills and to develop respectful relationships, in full partnership with young persons, parents, legal guardians, caregivers, educators and health-care providers, in order to, inter alia, enable them to protect themselves from HIV infection and other risks; 


 (e) Developing, adopting, strengthening and implementing legislation and policies that address the issue of sexual harassment in a comprehensive manner by, inter alia, prohibiting and considering, where appropriate, criminalizing sexual harassment, exercising due diligence by taking protective and preventive measures, ensuring appropriate complaints mechanisms and reporting procedures, as well as accountability and access to effective, timely and appropriate remedies, including through adequate enforcement by the police and the judiciary of civil remedies, orders of protection and, where applicable, criminal sanctions in order to eliminate impunity and avoid revictimization;
  (f) Accelerating efforts to develop, review and strengthen inclusive and gender-responsive policies, including by allocating adequate resources, to address the structural and underlying causes of sexual harassment against women and girls, to overcome gender stereotypes and negative social norms, to encourage the media to examine the impact of gender-role stereotypes, including those perpetuated by commercial advertisements, that foster gender-based violence, sexual exploitation and inequalities, to promote zero tolerance for such violence and to remove the stigma of being a victim and survivor of violence, thus creating an enabling and accessible environment where women and girls can easily report incidents of violence and make use of the services available, including protection and assistance programmes;  
(g) Taking measures to ensure that all officials, including those in leadership positions, responsible for implementing policies and programmes aimed at preventing violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment, protecting and assisting the victims and investigating and punishing acts of violence receive ongoing, adequate and gender- and culturally sensitive training to be aware of genderspecific needs, as well as of the underlying causes and short- and long-term impact of sexual harassment; 
 (h) Removing barriers, including political, legal, cultural, social, economic, institutional and religious ones, preventing women’s full, equal and effective participation in leadership and political and other decision-making positions, taking into account that promoting women to leadership positions may significantly reduce the risk of sexual harassment;  
(i) Taking measures to ensure that all workplaces are free from discrimination and exploitation, violence, and sexual harassment and bullying and that they address discrimination and violence against women and girls, as appropriate, through such measures as regulatory and oversight frameworks and reforms, collective agreements, codes of conduct, including appropriate disciplinary measures, protocols and procedures, and referral of cases of violence to health services for treatment and to police for investigation, as well as through awareness-raising and capacity-building, in collaboration with employers, unions and workers, including through workplace services and flexibility for victims and survivors;  
(j) Taking measures to improve the safety of girls at and on the way to and from school, including by creating a safe and violence-free environment by improving infrastructure, such as transportation, providing hygienic, separate and adequate sanitation facilities, improved lighting, playgrounds and safe environments and adopting policies to prevent, address and prohibit sexual harassment through all appropriate measures; 

9. Also urges States to take effective action to protect victims of all forms of violence, including sexual harassment, including by:  

(a) Providing relevant, comprehensive and victim-centred legal protection to support and assist victims of violence, including sexual harassment, in a gendersensitive manner, including victim and witness protection from reprisals for bringing 
Intensification of efforts to prevent and eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls: sexual harassment complaints or giving evidence, within the framework of their national legal systems, including, as appropriate, legislative or other measures throughout the criminal and civil justice system, as appropriate, paying particular attention to women and girls facing multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination;  
(b) Establishing comprehensive, coordinated, interdisciplinary, accessible and sustained multisectoral services, programmes and responses for all victims and survivors of all forms of violence, including sexual harassment, that are adequately resourced, that are, when possible, in a language that they understand and in which they can communicate and that include effective and coordinated action by, as appropriate, relevant stakeholders, such as the police and the justice sector, as well as providers of legal aid services, health services, shelters, medical and psychological assistance, counselling services and protection, and, in cases of girl victims, ensuring that such services, programmes and responses take into account the best interests of the child;  
(c) Establishing and/or strengthening law enforcement, health and social workers’ and counsellors’ response protocols and procedures to ensure that all appropriate actions are taken to protect and respond to the needs of victims of violence, including sexual harassment, to identify acts of violence and to prevent their recurrence or further acts of violence and physical and psychological harm, ensuring that services are responsive to the survivors’ needs, including by providing access to female health-care providers, police officers and counsellors if requested, and ensuring and maintaining the privacy of victims and the confidentiality of their reporting; 

https://undocs.org/en/A/RES/73/148
Leer más...

Monday, January 28, 2019

Intensification of efforts to prevent and eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls: sexual harassment 1/3




 The General Assembly,  Recalling its resolutions 61/143 of 19 December 2006, 62/133 of 18 December 2007, 63/155 of 18 December 2008, 64/137 of 18 December 2009, 65/187 of 21 December 2010, 67/144 of 20 December 2012, 69/147 of 18 December 2014 and all its previous resolutions on the elimination of violence against women, as well as its resolution 71/170 of 19 December 2016 on the intensification of efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls,  Reaffirming the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,1 and noting that 2018 marks its seventieth anniversary,  Reaffirming also the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action,2 and noting that 2018 marks its twenty-fifth anniversary,  Recalling Human Rights Council resolution 38/5 of 5 July 2018, entitled “Accelerating efforts to eliminate violence against women and girls: preventing and responding to violence against women and girls in digital contexts”,3  Taking note of the agreed conclusions of the Commission on the Status of Women at its sixty-first session4 and Commission resolution 61/1 of 24 March 2017 on preventing and eliminating sexual harassment in the workplace,

 Reaffirming the obligation of all States to promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms, and reaffirming also that discrimination on the basis of sex is contrary to the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, 6  the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights,6 the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women7 and the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Optional Protocols thereto,8 

Reaffirming also the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women,9  the Beijing Declaration10  and Platform for Action,11  the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development12  and the outcomes of their review conferences, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples,13  

Recalling the commitment to eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation, contained in Sustainable Development Goal 5, in particular target 5.2,14 and taking into account the commitment to leave no one behind,  

Deeply concerned about violence against women and girls in all its different forms and manifestations worldwide, which is underrecognized and underreported, particularly at the community level, and its pervasiveness, which reflects discriminatory norms that reinforce stereotypes and gender inequality and the corresponding impunity and lack of accountability, reiterating the need to intensify efforts to prevent and eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls in the public and private spheres in all regions of the world, and re-emphasizing that violence against women and girls violates, and impairs their full enjoyment of, all human rights,  

Recognizing that violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment, is rooted in historical and structural inequality in power relations between men and women, seriously violates and impairs or nullifies the enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by women and girls and constitutes a major impediment to their full, equal and effective participation in society, as well as economic and political life,  
Bearing in mind that sexual harassment in private and public spaces, including in educational institutions and the workplace, as well as in digital contexts, leads to a hostile environment, which has a further negative impact on women and girls in the enjoyment of their rights and equal opportunities, has negative physical and mental health consequences for the victims and may negatively affect their families, 

 Recognizing the particular risk of sexual harassment faced by women and girls who suffer multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination,  Acknowledging that sexual harassment may be committed against girls who are working in accordance with national legislation or under other circumstances, while condemning child labour in all its forms, and reaffirming Member States’ obligations in accordance with international law to protect children, including from economic exploitation,  

Recognizing that women and girls are frequently subjected to violence, including sexual harassment, at work and that women and girls face increased risks of violence, including sexual harassment, in particular contexts, such as when working alone, when working in male-dominated workplaces, when working outside the normal working hours or when working in the same place where they live, bearing in mind the large number of women and girls worldwide who have reported being victims of sexual harassment in their workplace, and concerned that, owing to underreporting, the actual number may be much greater,  

Stressing the need to change social norms that condone violence against women and girls in the workplace, including through, but not limited to, training and awareness-raising campaigns conducted in the workplace, associated with a change in attitudes and increased knowledge about sexual harassment, particularly among men and boys,  

Deeply concerned that school-related violence against girls, including sexual violence and harassment on the way to and from and at school, such as violence perpetrated by school staff, including teachers, and other pupils, continues to deter girls from accessing and pursuing an education and, in many cases, the transition to and completion of secondary education, and that these risks may influence the decision of parents to allow girls to attend school,  
Underscoring that often lack of information and awareness, fear of reprisals, persisting impunity, insufficient recourse for violence against women and girls and negative social norms, including when leading to shame or stigma, as well as negative economic consequences, such as, inter alia, loss of livelihood or reduced income, prevent many women and, as applicable, girls from reporting or acting as witnesses and from seeking redress and justice in cases of sexual harassment,  

Deeply concerned about all acts of violence, including sexual harassment, against women and girls involved in political and public life, including women in leadership positions, journalists and other media workers and human rights defenders,  

Recognizing that the growing impact of violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment, in digital contexts, especially on social media, its impunity and the lack of preventive measures and remedies underline the need for action by Member States, in partnership with relevant stakeholders, and that such violence may include stalking, death threats and threats of sexual and gender-based violence, as well as related trends against women and girls in digital contexts, such as trolling, cyberbullying and other forms of cyberharassment, including unwanted verbal or non-verbal conduct of a sexual nature, with a view to discrediting women and girls and/or inciting other violations and abuses against them,  

Acknowledging the importance of combating trafficking in persons in order to prevent and eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment, and in this regard stressing the importance of the full and effective implementation of the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime,15 as well as of the United Nations Global Plan of Action to Combat Trafficking in Persons,16 

 Emphasizing that the lack or inadequacy of documentation, research and data, including disaggregated data, on sexual harassment against women and girls impedes efforts to design and implement measures, including, where appropriate, policies and legislation, to prevent and eliminate this form of violence,  

Stressing that laws addressing violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment, are often of limited scope, that those addressing sexual harassment do not cover many workplaces, such as those of domestic workers, including migrant domestic workers, and that gaps need to be addressed,  

Stressing also that, while the obligation and the primary responsibility to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms lie with the State, employers and education providers have the primary responsibility to take measures to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace and at educational institutions, respectively,  

Stressing further that States, employers and education providers should take immediate, appropriate corrective action after sexual harassment has occurred by holding perpetrators to account and providing access to timely and appropriate remedies and protection for victims and witnesses, bearing in mind that victims of sexual harassment may be subjected to further discrimination or reprisals,  Recognizing the increase in public awareness and advocacy on sexual harassment, and stressing the need to accelerate government action to tackle sexual harassment,  

Highlighting the crucial role that educational and awareness-raising programmes, policies and legislation play in preventing and eliminating sexual harassment against women and girls,  

Stressing the need to fully engage men and boys as strategic partners and allies in achieving gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls and in preventing and eliminating sexual harassment,  Recognizing the critical contribution of family members in combating violence against women and girls, including sexual harassment, by, inter alia, providing for a supportive environment for the empowerment of all women and girls, and that, in preventing such violence, the family can play an important role, 



https://undocs.org/en/A/RES/73/148
Leer más...

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Language Has Political Power - Terms of Reference for CSW





















































LANGUAGE EQUALS POWER

Language is not just semantics. It has political power. And, ultimately, language agreed within
the UN by governments can influence and often lead to programs and policies on the ground.
Leer más...