Sunday, May 13, 2018

Exploring Best Practices in Combatting Violence Against Women: Sweden 1/9



Sweden is the third largest country in the European Union (EU), located in Northern Europe. In January 2018, Sweden had a population of 10 128 320, with an increase of 1,2  % compared with the same period previous year. The increase is partly due to the fact that many foreign citizens have been granted Swedish citizenship in the past two years: in 2017, in total 68 898 persons from over 160 countries became Swedish citizens, which represents an increase of 14 % compared with the previous record in 2016. Syrian citizens were the largest group to be granted Swedish citizenship: in 2017, Swedish citizenship was granted to 8 635 Syrian citizens which is nearly twice as many as in the previous year.

In Sweden, politics take place in the framework of a parliamentary representative democratic constitutional monarchy. Executive power is exercised by the government, led by the Prime Minister. Legislative power is vested in both the government and parliament, elected within a multi-party system. The Judiciary is independent, appointed by the government and employed until retirement. The current democratic regime is a product of a stable development of successively added democratic institutions introduced during the 19th century up to 1921, when also women's suffrage was introduced. 

Sweden is well known for progressive gender politics and an advanced welfare system. The Scandinavian nation is a forerunner of gender equality driven by both an intellectual and practical feminist movement. By the mid-19th century women were given compulsory primary education, and at the start of the 20th century, social change in the realm of gender equality and work life gained traction, with gender neutral language to public offices applications among other accomplishments. By 1921, women had received the vote and present day Sweden consistently ranks among the top countries in the world for gender equality.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/IDAN/2018/604958/IPOL_IDA(2018)604958_EN.pdf

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